Roll over, rolled oats! Manufacturer markets lupin as high protein, high fiber ingredient for bars, granola

By Adi Menayang contact

- Last updated on GMT

Getty Images / homydesigns
Getty Images / homydesigns

Related tags: Fiber, Protein, plant-based

Ingredient supplier CK Nutraceuticals is launching lupin-derived flour and flakes to target North American manufacturers in the nutritional bar space.

Lupin is a legume popularly eaten and used in the cuisines of people along the Mediterranean coast. CK Nutraceutical’s ingredient, called LuPro, can substitute wherever rolled oats are traditionally used, providing a higher fiber, higher protein nutritional profile to a finished product, the company’s president Michael Chernyak told us.

For instance, replacing 50% of the rolled outs with Lupin Flakes increases both protein and fiber by approximately 70%​,” he said.

Chernyak said that the flakes are a good fit for nutritional bar and granola applications, while a finer flour format can be used to add protein and fiber in food products like pasta, snacks, meat analogs and more.

As for protein or fiber beverages, “We supply a micronized Lupin Flour that can be applied in beverage applications; it is better suited to smoothie-type beverages where completely solubility is not essential.  We’re also exploring the possibility of using Lupin in non-dairy milks; we see potential in this area,” ​he said.

CK Nutraceuticals observed a growth in use of lupin in the European market. The company formed an alliance with growers and processors of lupin in France to supply the beans used in the ingredient. The company touts that ingredient is a ‘whole-food ingredient,’ meaning that the protein or fiber is not isolated.

The ingredient rides on the coattails of increased demand for gluten-free products. It is also well-positioned to serve formulators of food and products for blood sugar management.

“Lupin has a very low glucose index thanks to very low starch content,”​ Chernyak said. “Published clinical data demonstrates Lupin’s value as an appetite suppressant (satiety effect) and its positive impact on blood glucose levels.”

"We have a large number development projects in both Canada and the U.S. that are progressing well – we are optimistic that a number of new products will hit the North American market in 2019,"​ he added.

“We see it potentially rivaling soy at some point in the future, once proper consumer awareness and education are in place.”

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