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Food-based iodine during pregnancy important for child brain development

Low levels of maternal iodine may be linked to reduced brain development at age three, a new study has suggested.

Study on calls to poison control centers overstates risk, experts say

A study that found a rising tide of reports to poison control centers about dietary supplement exposures reaches some faulty conclusions, say experts familiar with adverse event reporting.

Researchers analyze efficacy of chewable plant stanol ester supplements

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was reduced by 7.6% among study participants who were supplemented with 2 g per day of a chewable plant sterol ester, according to researchers at the...

Infant gut bacteria link with smarter toddlers: Study

The make-up of babies’ gut microbiomes may be associated with with later cognitive development, suggests new research.

Science Short

Cannabinoids may be responsible for omega-3 anti-inflammatory effect: Study

The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids may be due to the action of endocannabinoids derived from them, suggests a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....

Go the whole whey for better muscle building

Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) taken as part of intact whey protein may stimulate muscle building response better than if taken in isolation, suggests a new study.

Long-fibre prebiotics show promising sweetness, say scientists

How to keep things sweet without adding calories – is it a Holy Grail or could UK scientists have found a solution thanks to long-fibre prebiotics?

Cause or consequence? Investigating the link between gut bacteria and heart health

People with heart failure have been found to have less gut bacteria diversity and lack certain important species groups. So are changes in our microbiome causing heart disease, or visa-versa?

New study on TeaCrine suggests co-administration with caffeine may help prevent the jitters

Ingesting theacrine with caffeine may help provide mental clarity, focus, and energy without the crash, researchers at the University of Memphis found.

Does iron supplementation promise lower heart attack risk?

Iron supplementation may be a low-cost approach in reducing the risk of heart disease, as a study identifies low levels as a risk factor for one of the leading causes...

Vitamin D trial shows ‘no benefit’ in already optimal kids

Higher vitamin D dosage does not lower the occurrence of winter colds in young children that are not deficient, a new study suggests.

Outlining 'environmental' view of microbiome awaits craftier study designs, experts say

A more holistic, environmental view of the human gut microbiome is taking shape among researchers, but confounding factors complicate the task of fully elucidating this via tenable study designs.

Researchers answer whether a low-fat or low-carb diet is more successful for weight loss

The long-raging debate over whether cutting carbs or cutting fat is a better way lose weight is a false dichotomy, according to new research published in the American Journal of...

Protein-antioxidant combo proves effective in post-exercise recovery

A combination of protein and antioxidant supplementation could be more effective in reducing muscle soreness post exercise compared to those taking these supplements separately.

Brazilian researchers find high amounts of caffeine, some drugs, in seized supplements

Caffeinated weight loss supplements that have been seized by the Brazilian Federal Police were analyzed. Investigators found that some contained up to 120% more caffeine that stated on the packaging.

The top ingredients for cognition, focus & mood

Memory, attention and focus, development, mood; there are numerous ways that a nutrient or bioactive ingredient can affect cognitive health. But which have the most science, how do they work?

GUEST ARTICLE: Can the food industry learn from the GMO story? Five ways to earn trust in gene editing

If you care about GMO labeling, you only have a few more days to respond to USDA's 30 questions* about how to implement the new law. The looming deadline is...

Coffee could ward off death and disease, researchers claim

Drinking three coffees a day is the optimal for lowering risk of all-cause death, says a study, which also found drinking higher levels increased risks for certain populations.

DayTwo open for business as science expands and investment secured

Personalized health player DayTwo has announced a new study deepening our understanding of how the microbiome can influence glycemic response.

Protein intake above recommended level may benefit bone health, says study

Though protein is popular among consumers as a nutrient for muscles, researchers at George Mason University review existing literature on its benefit for the bones and hip fracture prevention. They...

Microbial fermentation could offer cost effective production method for anthocyanins, say researchers

Microbes can convert sugar into the red anthocyanin pigments found in fruits via a fermentation process that – when perfected – could prove to be much more efficient than extracting...

Vitamin D: Good for the heart or not?

A controversy remains over the links between vitamin D and heart disease, according to a new review. 

Study finds macular carotenoids beneficial in ameliorating effects of blue light exposure

A recent study using OmniActive’s Lutemax 2020 ingredient showed marked beneficial effects in helping to ameliorate the effects of long term blue light exposure.

Athletes and the gut microbiota: Can we mine for new probiotics?

The gut microbiomes of athletes are more diverse than non-athletes, and scientists at Harvard are predicting that new probiotics derived from athletic microbiomes could be hitting the market within two...

Vitamin K2 may be beneficial for athletic training: Study

Supplements of vitamin K2 may boost the output of the heart by 12% in aerobically trained males and female athletes, says a new study.