Red clover appears to have little effect on hot flashes

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Hot flashes, Estrogen, Menopause

Red clover extracts marketed to treat menopause symptoms had no
significant effect on hot flashes, reported researchers in this
week's Journal of the American Medical Association.

Red clover extracts marketed to treat menopause symptoms had no significant effect on hot flashes, reported researchers in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association​.

The study compared the effects of placebo with the products Promensil (82mg of total isoflavones per day) and Rimostil (57mg of total isoflavones per day) in a group of 250 menopausal women, who were experiencing at least 35 hot flashes each week.

After follow-up for 12 weeks, the reductions in mean daily hot flashes were similar for both supplement groups and the placebo group. However participants in the Promensil group saw a quicker reduction in hot flashes, reported the team.

Quality-of-life improvements and adverse events were also the same in the three groups.

The results challenge the positive findings of a study​ published last year, which found that 40mg of Promensil daily reduced hot flashes by nearly 50 per cent.

Dietary supplements containing isoflavones, such as those found in red clover or soy, are widely used as alternatives to hormonal therapies for hot flashes, especially since evidence showing increased risk of cardiovascular disease and breast cancer among women using hormone replacement therapy.

Data on the efficacy of isoflavones is however inconclusive. A recent report​ suggested that the natural chemicals may work best on initial hot flashes.

At the same time, the manufacturer of the supplements, Australian firm Novogen issued information on a study showing Promensil to help alleviate vaginal dryness in menopausal women.

A double-blind, placebo controlled trial by King's College Hospital London, found Promensil to minimise the condition, experienced by around half of menopausal women.

Dr Whitehead, director of the Gynaecology / Endocrinology Unit, King's College Hospital London, said: "Unlike steroidal estrogens, the natural isoflavone phytoestrogens or plant estrogens provided by the red clover supplement are showing a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-like effect i.e. giving a welcome estrogenic effect in relieving vaginal dryness while showing no adverse thickening effect on the endometrium."

Related topics: Research

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