Zinc - antioxidant potential probed

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Red blood cell, Cell membrane, Zinc, Zinc deficiency

Researchers from the US claim the essential mineral zinc may help
protect cells against oxidative damage. Not usually linked to
antioxidant properties, the scientists say that zinc may safeguard
red blood cell membranes against oxidative effects of other
minerals such as copper or iron.

The essential mineral zinc may help protect cells against oxidative damage, according to results from a preliminary study.

Scientists from the Agricultural Research Service, the scientific research agency of the US Department of Agriculture, along with colleagues from the University of California, Berkeley claim to have pinpointed the mineral's little-known role as an antioxidant.

The researchers maintain that zinc may safeguard red blood cell membranes against oxidative effects of other minerals such as copper or iron. Cell membranes keep cell contents in place and selectively allow salts and other compounds to flow in and out.

The findings suggest that cell membrane health may be an early, accurate indicator of an individual's zinc needs. The study also confirms the importance of consistently consuming enough zinc from such foods as beans, wholegrains, shellfish, red meat or dark-meat poultry.

The researchers worked with eight healthy men, aged 27 to 47, who volunteered for the 20-week experiment. The foods that the volunteers ate provided only 4.6 milligrams of zinc, the amount recommended by the United Nations' World Health Organisation.

For the first five and last five weeks of the study, they also took gelatine capsules that provided an additional 9.1 milligrams of zinc daily. For the middle 10 weeks of the experiment, the capsules were replaced with placebos, meaning the only zinc provided during that time was the 4.6 milligrams from the food.

Volunteers' red blood cell membranes were significantly more fragile when measured after the 10-week, low-zinc stint. This cell membrane change occurred in the absence of standard indicators of zinc deficiency, according to the researchers. The team used several different laboratory procedures, including one known as an osmotic fragility test, to assess membrane strength.

The research was presented at a recent conference of the International Society for Trace Element Research in Humans, held in Quebec, Canada.

Related topics: Research

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