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Curcumin may match exercise for heart health benefits: RCT data

1 commentBy Stephen Daniells , 31-Oct-2012

Daily supplements of curcumin may benefit cardiovascular health to the same extent as exercise for postmenopausal women, says new data from a clinical trial from Japan.

Vascular health, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), improved equally in groups of women receiving the curcumin supplements and those receiving aerobic exercise training, according to findings published in Nutrition Research .

A recent study in the British Journal of Nutrition  indicated that decreased FMD is reported to be a predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, with every 1% decrease in FMD associated with a 12% increase in risk.

 “Therefore, regular ingestion of curcumin could be a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women,” they wrote.

“Furthermore, our results suggest that curcumin may be a potential alternative […] for patients who are unable to exercise.”

Benefits

Curcumin, the natural pigment that gives the spice turmeric its yellow color, has increasingly come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential health benefits.

As a result, curcumin has been linked to a range of health benefits, including potential protection against prostate cancer, Alzheimer’s, protection against heart failure, diabetes, and arthritis.

The new study suggests that endothelial function may also be added to the list of potential benefits from curcumin.

Endothelial health is gaining more visibility with the product formulation community. One of the sessions at the recent IFT show in Las Vegas in June focused on the category as a possible avenue for new health claims.

A recent article by NutraIngredients-USA discussed the potential of the market and how to communicate the benefits to consumers.

Study details

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba recruited 32 post-menopausal women and assigned them to one of three groups: The first group acted as the controls, the second group underwent an aerobic exercise training regime, and the third group received curcumin supplements (Theracurmin from Theravalues Corporation, Tokyo).

The curcumin used in the study was described as a “highly absorptive curcumin dispersed with colloidal nanoparticles”. A daily dose of 25 milligrams was provided.

The study lasted for eight weeks, after which the results showed that FMD increased significantly and equally by about 1.5% in both the exercise and curcumin groups, compared with no changes in the control group.

“The mechanism responsible for the curcumin ingestion induced improvement in endothelial function is unclear,” said the researchers.

“Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), suggesting that its effect on endothelial function may be mediated by the suppression of inflammation and/or oxidative stress via down-regulation of TNF-alpha. However, TNF-alpha levels were mot assessed in this study.

“Further studies are warranted to clarify the mechanism underlying the effect of curcumin on endothelial function.”

The study was funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Source: Nutrition Research
Published online ahead of print, doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2012.09.002
“Curcumin ingestion and exercise training improve vascular endothelial function in postmenopausal women”
Authors: N. Akazawa, Y. Choi, A. Miyaki, Y. Tanabe, J. Sugawara, R. Ajisaka, S. Maeda

1 comment (Comments are now closed)

Sustainability of turmeric

There is a lot of information available on the benefits of curcumin.

Curcumin is extracted from turmeric and is beginning to be used extensively in non food applications primarily in the nutraceutical business. Nutraceutical companies pay high prices for the turmeric making purchases for food applications expensive.

Turmeric acreage is not increasing rapidly and prices are not fair to the farmers. Something needs to be done quickly to address the potential imbalance in supply and demand and improve the varieties with high yields and high curcumin breeds.

We also need to address the issue of turmeric for food or nutraceutical purposes. Which is more important and urgent?

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Posted by Jaisinh Vaerkar
31 October 2012 | 17h44

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